News

CogSci Colloquium: Mark S. Seidenberg

The Cognitive Science Colloquium Series is proud to present Mark S. Seidenberg, Vilas Research Professor and Donald O. Hebb Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

Friday, April 26th, 4pm, Oak 117

Dr. Seidenberg will provide a talk entitled “The Science and Politics of Learning to Read”

Abstract: A remarkably high percentage of children and adults acquire only basic reading skills, causing innumerable problems for individuals and society. Low literacy has multiple causes, some of which seem intractable (e.g., poverty). I nonetheless think we could be doing much better than we are. Part of the problem is a disconnection between the cultures of science and education. Scientists know a great deal about how reading works and children learn, little of which has had any impact on teacher education or classroom practices. I’ll look at these cross-cultural differences, how they developed, and what might be done to overcome them.

If you are interested in meeting with Dr. Seidenberg, please contact Dr. Altmann: gerry.altmann@uconn.edu


Funded summer opportunity: Diverse Intelligences Summer Institute

From Erica Cartmill, Assistant Professor at UCLA:
I am writing to share the news about an exciting funded summer opportunity for graduate students, postdocs, and early career faculty. In 2018, I launched a new summer program, the Diverse Intelligences Summer Institute (DISI for short), with my colleague Jacob Foster, a computational sociologist at UCLA. You can find more details about last summer’s DISI, as well as a short video, at www.diverseintelligencessummer.com.
The basic idea behind DISI is simple: to bring together promising graduate students, postdocs, and early career faculty interested in the study of mind, cognition, and intelligence for several weeks of transdisciplinary exploration. The first year was a great success, and we are delighted to be expanding the scope of DISI in 2019! We are increasing the number of participants, welcoming back alumni, and broadening the topics offered by faculty. We are also introducing a new “storytellers” track to host artists-in-residence at DISI. We hope that this vibrant community will work together to develop new ways of engaging with big questions about intelligence, cognition, and the mind.
We are holding the 2019 Summer Institute at the University of St Andrews, Scotland, from June 30 to July 20. As you probably know, this is a beautiful seaside location, easily accessible from Edinburgh International Airport, and a picturesque train journey North from London. We’ve already assembled an outstanding international faculty (www.diverseintelligencessummer.com/faculty), and more are yet to be added. In addition to lectures and discussions, DISI offers participants the opportunity to develop collaborative interdisciplinary research projects with support from faculty and staff.
I’ve attached a flyer advertising the Institute, and included a link to our website below. I would be grateful if you could forward this announcement to talented graduate students, postdocs, and other early career researchers who might be interested. We are also hoping to reach writers and artists of all types for our storyteller track! In both the academic and storyteller tracks, we are looking for creative, open-minded participants who want to take intellectual risks and break down disciplinary barriers in the spirit of dialogue and discovery.
 
The main application deadline is February 15. Storyteller and alumni applications will be rolling. Application portals can be found at www.diverseintelligencessummer.com/apply
If potential applicants have any questions, they can reach out to our wonderful Associate Director, Dr. Kensy Cooperrider, at disi@ucla.edu.
Thanks so much for helping us build an exciting new intellectual community!

Job: Assistant Psychology Professor at Eastern Illinois University

Eastern Illinois University, Department of Psychology Position Announcement, Assistant Professor (2)

The Psychology Department at Eastern Illinois University has openings for two full-time (9-month) tenure-track faculty positions in (1) cognitive neuroscience and (2) biopsychology or behavioral neuroscience. Duties include teaching undergraduate courses in psychology (in areas of expertise, as well as areas of general need), maintaining an active research program, and participating in service to the department and university. Individuals should also demonstrate commitment to diversity an experience with promoting inclusive excellence. The anticipated start date is August 16, 2019. Individuals applying for the first position should hold a Ph.D. in cognitive neuroscience or a closely related area. Individuals applying for the second position should hold a Ph.D. in biopsychology, behavioral neuroscience, or closely related area. Candidates are expected to have a doctoral degree (Ph.D.) at the time of appointment. Other requirements include demonstrated evidence of teaching excellence at the college/university level and a commitment to research and scholarly activity. To apply, please submit the following: letter of application, vita, three confidential letters of reference, and available reprints. For position 1 (cognitive neuroscience), send application materials via Interfolio at https://apply.interfolio.com/54761. For position 2 (biopsychology/behavioral neuroscience), send application materials via Interfolio at https://apply.interfolio.com/54784. Review of applications will begin on January 7, 2019 and will continue until the positions are filled. For questions regarding this search, please contact Jeffrey Stowell, Screening Committee Chair, at jrstowell@eiu.edu. The Department of Psychology serves over 400 undergraduate and graduate students, having undergraduate programs in psychology (BA) and neuroscience (BS), as well as graduate programs in clinical psychology (MA) and school psychology (MA, SSP). The Department also has an undergraduate honors program, and serves approximately 200 minors in psychology and neuroscience. Eastern Illinois University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer – minority/female/disability/veteran – committed to achieving a diverse community.

Speaker: Philip Corlett of Yale, 9/6

Philip Corlett, Yale University: Finding Beliefs in the Brain: Hallucinations, Delusions & Predictive Processing.

 

Wed 9/6 at 1:25pm in Bousfield (room 162). 

 

The speaker is a cognitive neuroscientist and his most recent publication “Pavlovian conditioning–induced hallucinations result from overweighting of perceptual priors” appeared this month in Science and describes some very interesting fMRI results.

 

BIOGRAPHY

Dr. Philip Robert Corlett trained in Experimental Psychology, Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychiatry with Professors Trevor Robbins and Paul Fletcher at the University of Cambridge. He won a Wellcome Trust Prize Studentship and completed his PhD on the brain bases of delusion formation in the Brain Mapping Unit, Department of Psychiatry. After a short postdoc, he was awarded the University of Cambridge Parke- Davis Exchange Fellowship in Biomedical Sciences which brought him to the Yale University Department of Psychiatry to explore the maintenance of delusions with Professors Jane Taylor and John Krystal. He was named a Rising Star and Future Opinion Leader by Pharmaceutical Marketing Magazine and joined the Yale faculty in 2011 where he will continue to explore the cognitive and biological mechanisms of delusional beliefs as well as predictive learning, habit formation and addiction.