Events

Expression, Language, and Music (ELM) Conference, May 13-15, 2020

Dear All,

We’re very pleased to announce a Call for Papers for ECOM’s new biennial conference Expression, Language, and Music (ELM) Conference, May 13-15, 2020 (to be held at the Lyceum Center, HartfordCT). The abstract submission deadline is December 9, 2019.

 

The conference will bring together researchers from linguistics, philosophy, cognitive science, music theory, dance theory, anthropology, and neurobiology with the aim of integrating recent findings and insights from diverse perspectives concerning the significance of expression in music, dance, and language, the importance of systematic structure in these domains, and the interrelations between expressive, musical, and communicative capacities and their relevance for understanding the emergence of language (in ontogeny and phylogeny). 

 

Our invited speakers are:

·         Tecumseh Fitch (Cognitive Biology, University of Vienna)

·         Kathleen Higgins (Philosophy, University of Texas, Austin)

·         Ray Jackendoff (Linguistics, Tufts University)

·         Jerrold Levinson (Philosophy, University of Maryland)

·         Elizabeth Margulis (Music Cognition, Princeton University) 

·         Isabelle Peretz (Psychology, University of Montreal)

·         David Poeppel (Neuroscience, NYU)

·         Ljiljana Progovac (Linguistics, Wayne State University)

 

Both the Poster and Call for Papers/Posters are attached. Please pass on/post as appropriate. And please save the dates! 

The conference website: https://elm.clas.uconn.edu

The conference email: elm@uconn.edu

 

Sincerely,

Dorit Bar-On, ECOM Director 

Aliyar Ozercan, ECOM Coordinator

 

 

CogSci Colloquium: Aaron Shield

Friday, November 1st

Time: 4:00pm

Room: Oak Hall 117

The Cognitive Science Colloquium Series is proud to present Aaron Shield, Professor in the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology at Miami University of Ohio.

Dr. Shield will provide a talk entitled Insights into cognitive and linguistic processes from research on autism and sign language

Abstract: In this talk, I will discuss how research into the signed languages of the deaf has the power to illuminate big questions about human language. By comparing spoken and signed languages, we gain a better understanding of what language is, how children learn languages, and how to best characterize and treat language disorders. In particular, I will show how research into the acquisition of American Sign Language (ASL) by deaf children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) sheds new light on various questions about acquisition, such as how children imitate linguistic forms, how children use pronouns and other words that refer to self and other, and how language exposure may affect other aspects of cognition.

Contact Inge-Marie Eigsti (inge-marie.eigsti@uconn.edu) to schedule a meeting with Prof. Shield.

Learn more about Aaron Shield.

CogSci Colloquium: Richard Wilson

The Cognitive Science Colloquium Series is proud to present Richard Ashby Wilson, Professor of Law and Anthropology and Gladstein Chair of Human Rights at UConn.

 

Friday, February 22nd, 4pm, Oak 117

The Psychology of Incitement and Hate Speech: A Dialogue Between Law and Social Science

 

We live in an era of nativist populism, characterized by speech that incites violence on social media, and an escalation in hate crimes. Recent social science research has identified a correlation between online incitement and offline hate crimes in the United States and Europe. What kinds of speech are the most likely to instigate acts of violence? The current research identifies revenge propaganda as the most likely type to instigate atrocities. We coded 242 speeches by a Serbian politician for references to revenge, nationalism, stereotyping, dehumanization, justice, victimization, past atrocities, political institutions and direct threats. After reading one speech or a control, participants answered questions about empathy, intentionality, and whether violence is morally justifiable. Only speeches focusing on revenge and past atrocities intensified justifications of violence. Only revenge speech increased overall negative attitudes towards the out-group. On the level of personality, those who are more politically conservative, feel the world is unjust, engage more in violent media and are male are more likely to justify violence. These findings have implications for the elusive goal of preventing atrocities. The regulatory framework established fifty years ago in the United States is showing signs of severe strain, and this research draws upon behavioral research to construct a systematic evidence-based framework for analyzing the risk that inciting speech will result in imminent lawless action.

 

If you are interested in meeting with Professor Wilson on 2/22, please contact Dr. Xygalatas:  dimitris.xygalatas@uconn.edu